Kale

The Redbor Kale that i planted in 2009 was ok but I think that I will grow my Dwarf Green Curled again for the 2010 season.

Kale is a little bit like Marmite, you either love it or hate it.  But if like me you love your greens, then you will love Kale.  In my view this is one of the strongest tasting greens there is.  It last all through winter frosts, is a good cropper and for those reasons alone is why everyone should grow some of these.

Kale or Borecole has it is also known is fairly easy to grow.  Kale is grown as other Brassica, so make sure you sow into modules in March for an early crop or into a seed bed.  But as i grow this as a winter veg I wait until May.

Sow the seeds half-inch deep in the seed bed or modules.  Seedlings should appear in about 1-2 weeks depending on weather and should be transplanted to the final position in about 6-8 weeks after sowing.  Water the young plants before removing and then puddle them in, (that is dropping the plants into the holes and pouring water into the hole) before returning soil, and firming the plants well in, so that the soil comes up to the first set of true leaves.

Keep the plants well watered and support the plants with wooden stakes as strong winds have been known to uproot them.  As the crop grows, remove yellowing leaves.

Harvesting the leaves can begin in late Autumn and can carry on till mid spring.  Cut the leaves when they are young, starting from the crown of the plant, working out, that will make the plant to bush out and produce side shoots.  Larger leaves can be eaten but i find these tougher and bitter so the younger leaves are more tender.

I cook my Kale by steaming which retains the flavour, but it can also be boiled and stir fried.  After steaming for a short while, i just add butter and black pepper.  Kale is a good source of iron and vitamins A,C, and E.

For the 2013 season I will be growing two types again:   Starbor and Dwarf  Green Curled.  Both are  densely curled varieties and can be grown into adult plants for winter usage, or picked when very young for salad leaves.  Again, keep well covered as pigeons love them and will decimate them all in one sitting.  I will be spraying them with a garlic solution, throughout the season, to ward off white fly as with my other Brassica.

2 Responses

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